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Exploring climate change and its impact on people, politics, and the environment.

January 28, 2014 at 8:24pm
1,967 notes
Reblogged from jtotheizzoe
karbs

Climate change is a fact.

— The freakin’ President of the United Sates, finally, in the State of the Union (via jtotheizzoe)

September 28, 2013 at 5:31pm
26 notes
Reblogged from climateadaptation
karbs

Roundup: Everything You Need to Know About the IPCC Report | Audubon Magazine Blog →

Longview coal port skeptics want thorough study - The Spokesman-Review →

The spotlight on coal exports steadily continues in Washington State, most recently with a public hearing in Spokane this past Wednesday over the proposed Millennium Terminal in Longview, WA. Conflict over the parameters of the environmental assessment persist, with coal export opponents calling for a broader assessment that will include, among other regional considerations, the impacts from the consumption of U.S. exported coal. The environmental impact statement for Washington State’s other main coal export terminal, the Gateway Pacific Terminal at Cherry Point in Bellingham, will officially include an evaluation of greenhouse gases from coal consumption.

George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication →

The “token communicator” (!) at the PNW Climate Science Conference, Connie Roser-Renouf, did a great presentation on current data for the Six Americas project, used to determine public engagement with climate issues. In a room full of modelers, the information seemed distressing. Check out the amazing work that Connie is doing with George Mason’s Center for Climate Change Communciation.

People trust scientists more than anyone when it comes to climate change.

— 

Senator Jeff Merkely (D-OR)

A lot of emphasis on the impact that scientific consensus has on convincing the public that climate change is real this morning. Not much consensus on how the “climate abyss” can be bridged, underlining the great need for climate communication folks to emerge from the data.

We’re back!

It’s been a long time, Tumblr. Shrinking Planet is back, and now we have Master’s degrees. Nothing can stop us now.

This week, we will be updating from the Pacific Northwest Climate Science Conference in Portland. Looking forward to meeting and learning from regional climate experts over the next few days!

ecowatchorg:

BREAKING: Senators Boxer and Sanders Introduce Climate Legislation
On the heels of President Obama’s call to action in his State of the Union address and the arrest of 48 environmental, civil rights and community leaders at a protest of the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, Senators Boxer (D-CA) and Sanders (I-VT) have introduced …

ecowatchorg:

BREAKING: Senators Boxer and Sanders Introduce Climate Legislation

On the heels of President Obama’s call to action in his State of the Union address and the arrest of 48 environmental, civil rights and community leaders at a protest of the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, Senators Boxer (D-CA) and Sanders (I-VT) have introduced …

We’ve just been stealing, stealing, stealing from our children, and it’s shocking. But is it true that there’s nothing that can be done? No absolutely not.

— Jane Goodall, one of the most inspiring environmental stewards of our generation, speaks about engaging youth in her program, Roots and Shoots, to draw awareness to the impacts of climate change.  <3 u, Jane!

Sixty-five percent of Americans support “the President taking significant steps to address climate change now,” including 89 percent of Democrats, 62 percent of independents and 38 percent of Republicans.

The survey finds that most Americans see climate change as a tangible threat, as 61 percent said climate change is already affecting them or will affect them sometime in their life. An overwhelming 93 percent say there is a moral obligation to leave an Earth not polluted or damaged to future generations, with 67 percent strongly agreeing.

— The Huffington Post reports on a new survey by the League of Conservation Voters taken just before the President’s State of the Union address last night.  There are indications that there may be growing political will to begin moving from rhetoric and towards action on climate mitigation and adaptation.  Will climate hawks pounce on the opportunity?

The Lens Blog at the New York Times has an amazing slideshow to photographs taken by Samuel Jones of the VII Photo Agency for Harper’s Magazine which documents illegal oil refining in Niger Delta.  Corporate oil producers have all but shut out some of the most vulnerable individuals from the fossil fuel profits in the region.  These same folks have turned to illicit refining to make a living in a community wracked with extreme poverty.

“The refining process itself is extremely risky. It requires boiling crude oil at high temperatures, then channeling the vapors into a cooling chamber filled with water. The technology is very rudimentary. For generations, men in the Niger Delta used this same process to distill palm sap into a potent gin known locally as Ogogoro. Sometimes wood fires such as the one in this image are used to boil crude. But more often, workers fill open pits with crude oil and light them on fire. The fumes and waste produced are toxic and flammable. Whole camps can, and often do, explode. You can tell where diesel cooking is going on because people are burned all over their bodies.”

Jones’ new article, “The Water of My Land,” is out in Harper’s this month (behind the paywall). 

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We are two ladies working on our graduate degrees in the Pacific Northwest. Our interests range from urban planning, rural development, renewable energy, sustainable design, food systems, environmental policy, and of course, climate change.

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